About

“I hate not being able to jump in the car and pop out to the shops or to pick up the kids from school, and worst of all, being reliant on an inadequate and expensive public transport system. I hate standing on the touchline of a football pitch and not being able to identify my son from the other 8 year olds in his team. I hate not being able to pick up and read a newspaper.”
“I escape from all of this for the 4 hours or so I am on the golf course."

The aim of this website is to promote disabled golf through competing at the highest possible level, nationally and internationally, in disabled competition and against able bodied players. I presently play on British and European disabled golf tours where finances allow.
The SDGP (Scottish Disability Golf Partnership, www.sdgp.org.uk) is a registered charity which runs a full tour and order of merit along with various training events held across the year to actively promote participation for golfers of all abilities and disabilities.

The European Disabled Golf Association (EDGA, www.edgagolf.com) runs competitions across Europe with Dutch, German, Turkish, Swedish, Norwegian, Finnish, Danish, French, Austrian, Spanish and Italian disabled opens held across the summer months. EDGA also has its own order of merit for golfers who meet a set medical requirement.

English Blind Golf www.blindgolf.co.uk runs a full tour in the UK and is also linked to International blind golf which allows blind golfers to play in events worldwide with events in Australia, the USA, South Africa and across Europe.

With huge televised competitions in South Africa, India, Japan and a full tour in the US and Canada, disabled golf is global, exciting and expensive, hence the need for sponsorship and support in order to compete at the highest level.

SPONSORSHIP AND SUPPORT
EVENT AND COACHING COSTS
4 x 30 minute coaching sessions with a PGA Level 3 coaching professional specialising in disabled golf is £100.
1 Day Scottish tour event £80 including travel (I use local guide to save on travel)
2 Day Scottish Open/Championship event £190 including travel (I use local guide to save on travel).
2015 US Blind Open £2200
British National Championships and British Disabled Masters £350
European Disabled/Blind Open Events in Austria, Spain, France, Sweden, Denmark, Norway, Czech Republic, Finland, Turkey, Holland, Italy and Germany, £800.
Australian Blind Open £2,200
South Africa Disabled Open £1900
US Blind Open £1800
The above are examples of Travel and entry fees only, I do take a sighted guide to overseas events which increases the travel and accommodation costs.

THE DREAM OF COMPETING AND TRAINING FULL TIME LIKE MANY OF OUR OLYMPIC/PARA OLYMPIC ATHELETES, WOULD COST AROUND £20, 000 PER YEAR INCLUDING ALL TRAVEL, COACHING COSTS AND A SMALL LIVING EXPENSE.
“IN JUST UNDER A YEAR, I QUALIFY TO PLAY ON THE EUROPEAN AND US SENIORS TOURS, MY GOAL IS TO BE THE FIRST EVER BLIND PLAYER TO PLAY IN A PROFESSIONAL EVENT”
IF YOU CONSIDERED SPONSORING ME AS ABOVE OVER THE NEXT 2 YEARS I WOULD ALSO CONSIDER GIVING UP MY AMATEUR STATUS AND TURNING PROFESSIONAL, IMAGINE THE PUBLICITY YOU WOULD RECEIVE BEING THE PRIMARY SPONSOR OF THE WORLDS FIRST BLIND GOLF PROFESSIONAL. CAN YOU HELP IN ANY SMALL WAY?


About Peter Osborne

I was diagnosed with “Bull’s Eye Maculopathy” a generic form of the more common Age Related Maculopathy in 2003. This was a bolt from the blue, as no one in my immediate family has any history of this disease. The outcome is I now have virtually no central vision. The central vision (the macular) allows us to see definition, faces for example and the ability to read, watch TV etc. People with little or no central vision struggle to focus, see people and faces, or anything other than things in the immediate vicinity, everything else is pretty much a blur. I recall my first real experience of this was taking my two children swimming. From the viewing gallery next to the pool I could not recognise my children from any of the other children; consequently they now wear rather bright swimming trunks in the pool.
In terms of golf, lining up is a problem, as picking a line is rather difficult when you cannot see the flag or the green. I use a range finder with about 8 times magnification, this allows me to pick out an object such as a large tree or a building directly behind the flag and fire away, hoping I have the right club………
Having peripheral vision left, I live in a small fuzzy world of about 30 to 50 yards; hence, I can get around the green although I do leave a lot of shots from 100 yards in short, though not being able to judge the distance. My main downfall is the amount of balls I lose. When I practice, fellow golfers race to play behind me, as I am like a ball fairy. I see the ball leave the club (normally yellow balls) but tend to go off in totally the wrong direction to the ball, consequently I try and play golf with someone else… I decided to join Morecambe Golf Club about 5 years ago and was given a handicap of 19. With work and family commitments this rose to 20 by the end of my first year. Nearly 4 years on I am now down to 12 and often play to single figures, I am still working to support my family so practice time is hard to find but the numerous wins over the last few years have made me even more determined to get even better.......